Art

Art I

Grades 9-12     Credit: 1
This course is designed to fulfill the New York State Regents requirement for graduation. The emphasis is on the principles of art and developing the student’s knowledge of art and the historical function of art, as well as their ability to master skills and techniques through art materials. Projects for this course include: Continuous Line Contour of a Harley Davidson Motorcycle (enlargement and abstraction of a detail showing highlights and shadows), Still Life Pencil Sketch (using gray value scale), Album Cover Design (looking at how art has influenced album and CD design through the history of the industry) Shattered Value Drawing(abstracting with the Gray Value Scale) One Point Perspective in the style of Georgio De Chirico Wrapped Snarling Animals (contours and intro to colors) Medieval and Illuminated Letters, Cubist Painting (using the Art room and school building for sources of inspiration) Handscapes (creating landscapes with hands as the subject) Fracture Planes (learning about Picasso, Gris and Braque)

Advanced Art – Drawing & Painting

Grades 11-12     Credit: 1
This course explores more advanced techniques of various artists such as O’Keeffe, Warhol, Seurat and Van Gogh. Each student will work with a variety of materials. Projects included in this course: Continuous Line Contour Watercolor/ Ink Landscape, Acrylic Nature Painting in the Style of Georgia O’Keeffe , Photo Negative Painting in the style of Andy Warhol, George Seurat Pointillism Drawing with markers, Pen and Ink in the Style of Vincent Van Gogh, Scratch Board Drawing using textures, Monochromatic Painting, Neo Pop Realism Pen and Ink Faces, Colored Pencil Abstract Architectural Design, Pastel Still Life, Pop Art Collage, Cut Paper Masterpiece, and Painting in the style of the Surrealists.

Art II & Sculpture

Grades 11-12     Credit: 1
This course explores the various forms and techniques of sculpture. Students work in the styles of several 20th century sculptors including Louise Nevelson and Henry Moore. Students also look at the works of various cultures, both ancient and present day. Projects for this course include: Found Object Art (Louise Nevelson), Contour Cardboard Reliefs, Ceremonial Masks, Carved Styrofoam Reliefs, Plaster Casting of a Famous Painting (recreated as a clay relief), 3D Box Sculptures, Figure Sculptures (looking at works by Henry Moore), 3D Creature Sculptures, Alexander Calder Free-Standing Design and Pop Art Sculpture.

Digital Photography: The Image in the Modern World

Grades 10-12     Credit: 1
At the conclusion of this course students will be able to accurately expose, compose, upload and edit digital images created using a Canon T3i or higher; safely maintain a DSLR camera; correctly use shallow or deep depths of field by accurately adjusting aperture to create different photographic styles; correctly use Adobe Lightroom to edit images; and, use Adobe Photoshop to create collages, business cards and other creative media.

Business

MKTG 120 – Principles of Marketing

Grades 11-12     Credit: .5
This course will provide an introduction to marketing. Students will learn about consumer behavior and gain an understanding of targeting and positioning. Additionally, the elements of the marketing mix including new product development, promotion, pricing, and distribution will be covered. The course will culminate with the submission of a semester-long research project. As this is a college-level course, students should expect to submit high level work in an academically demanding environment.
This course is part of the College in the High School program. A student may earn college credit from Hudson Valley Community College upon successful completion of this course

MKTG 200 – Advertising

Grades 11-12     Credit: .5
This course provides a basic understanding of advertising and the advertising industry and will expand upon concepts studied in Principles of Marketing. Advertising in radio, television, magazines, and newspapers will be studied. An integrated marketing communications approach also will be presented, and various communication/promotional efforts will be examined. The course will culminate with the submission a semester-long research project. As this is a college-level course, students should expect to submit high level work in an academically demanding environment.
This course is part of the College in the High School program. A student may earn college credit from Hudson Valley Community College upon successful completion of this course

Accounting I

Grades 11-12     Credit: 1
The objective of this course is to provide a solid foundation in basic accounting concepts and techniques for students who plan to pursue a career in accounting, as well as students expressing a general interest in accounting. The course covers the traditional topics including the accounting cycle, financial statement analysis, and coverage of asset, liabilities and stockholder’s equity. Topics are strengthened through the students participating in projects involving researching financial information of a given company and presenting their findings to the class. This course is part of the College in the High School program and may be taken for credit from Hudson Valley Community College.
This course is part of the College in the High School program. A student may earn college credit from Hudson Valley Community College upon successful completion of this course

English

English 9 Honors or English 9 Regents

Grade 9     Credit: 1
The ninth grade curriculum is literature-based. Students explore short stories, poetry, novels, plays and a variety of non-fiction works. Students are actively engaged in discussion and group activities. Writing assignments focus on response to and analysis of literature, personal reflection, research and creative writing. Public speaking projects help students become more comfortable communicating their thoughts and experiences in front of an audience of peers and teachers.

The Honors course challenges students with additional reading and writing assignments and requires them to do a substantial amount of work outside of the classroom. Students in the Honors class must have the self-discipline and desire to challenges themselves intellectually.

English 10 Honors or English 10 Regents

Grade 10     Credit: 1
This course has two levels of instruction: Regents and Honors. The curriculum consists of a thorough study of American literature including novels, essays, poetry and plays. Writing assignments will include response to and analysis of literature, narrative and expository essays. Students will be expected to be prepared for and fully engaged in class discussion. Collaborative learning will be an important component of classroom instruction.

Students in the Honors class will be responsible for several independent literature-based projects throughout the year, including an in-depth author study research paper during the second semester.

Guidelines for Entry into the Honors Class:

  • An 85 average in English 9H or a 90 average in English 9R
  • Recommendation from the grade 9 English teacher

English 11 Regents

Grade 11     Credit: 1
Modern literature from a variety of authors and genres provides the focus for continued development of students’ reading, writing and critical thinking skills in preparation for the rigors of college study. Class discussion and writing assignments will begin with responses to the assigned literature. Students will be expected to be prepared for and engaged in class discussion. Students will be writing analytical, narrative and expository essays and in the spring semester will write a joint History and English research paper.

AP English Literature and Composition

Grade 12     Credit: 1
The AP English class is the equivalent of an introductory English class for college freshmen. Students will be reading, analyzing and interpreting imaginative literature – short fiction, novels, plays, poetry – written from the 16th and 21st centuries. Students will develop their skills as readers and critical thinkers through close reading and active discussion of numerous texts. Writing will be an integral part of the course, both in response to literature – informally in journals and formally in analytical essays – and in imaginative pieces in prose and poetry. All students must take the AP English Literature and Composition Exam, given in May.

Prerequisites: 85 average in English 11H and/or recommendation from the 11th grade English teacher.

English 12

Grade 12     Credit: 1
This is a college prep English class. A primary objective of the class is to further develop students’ skills and confidence in writing effectively in various genres; reading thoughtfully and perceptively; listening with openness and understanding; speaking in and to a group; working collaboratively as well as independently in a spirit of experimentation; thinking critically; and, directing and assessing their own learning.

The fall semester will focus on reading and writing in response to modern and contemporary literature – short stories, novels, plays and essays. In the spring semester the focus will shift to the study of expository writing, research and film.

AP English Language and Composition

Grade 12     Credit: 1
The AP English class is the equivalent of an introductory English class for college freshmen.

The primary focus of this course will be reading and analyzing works of literature and nonfiction texts with the goal of identifying the author’s purpose and audience in crafting these writings. In turn, students will develop their own writing techniques for different purposes and audiences through the use of rhetoric: writing and speaking with the purpose/goal of persuading, informing, or motivating an audience regarding a particular topic or area of interest. Students will examine various historical documents, such as the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, and presidential speeches and determine the writer’s purpose. Additionally, students will read, research, and ultimately write about and present topics of personal interest and world/current events using a rhetorical approach. All students enrolled in the course must take the AP English Language and Composition Exam, given in May.

Guidelines for Entry:

  • Must be a Junior or a Senior in good standing
  • Teacher Recommendation
  • Strong interest in persuasive writing and speaking

Foreign Language

Spanish I

Credit: 1
This course begins the New York State plan for second language study. The emphasis in this course is on listening comprehension, basic pronunciation patterns, oral expression, elementary grammar and culture.

Spanish II

Credit: 1
This course continues the emphasis on listening and speaking skills. The students practice reading for comprehension. There is a continued study of basic grammatical structures and culture.

Prerequisite: Spanish I or Placement Exam.

Spanish III

Credit: 1
This course emphasizes basic skills in listening, speaking, grammar, reading and writing. It completes the three-year Foreign Language sequence of the New York State plan for foreign language study and the requirement at CBA.

Spanish III Honors

Credit: 1
This course emphasizes basic skills in listening, speaking, grammar, reading and writing. It provides more in depth in class instruction, requires more in class speaking, and assigns more reading and writing exercises. It is expected that the students will be given more at home assignments. The course completes the New York State three-year sequence for Foreign Language study and the CBA requirement.

Spanish IV (UHS Intermediate Spanish 200)

Credit: 1
This course covers the equivalent of a third-year college course in Advanced Spanish writing and composition. It encompasses oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar and writing composition. Students are introduced to Spanish and Latin American authors. This course may be taken for college credit through the University at Albany University in the High School program.

Prerequisite: Final average of at least 85 in Spanish 3 and teacher recommendation.

Spanish V (UHS Intermediate Spanish 201)

Credit: 1
This course covers the curriculum for the Advanced Placement Examination in the Spanish Language. Emphasis is on reading comprehension, writing composition, grammar and oral skills. Students are prepared for the Advanced Placement Examination in the Spanish Language. This course may be taken for college credit through the University at Albany University in the High School program.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish IV and teacher recommendation.

Leadership Education and Training/Junior Reserve Office Training Corp (JROTC)

JROTC 9

Credit: 1
The mission of Leadership Education and Training (LET) is to motivate first year JROTC Cadets to be better citizens. To accomplish this purpose, the text discusses citizenship, leadership, and a number of other courses designed to help the cadets succeed in high school and after graduation. Cadets wear uniforms every day. Extracurricular activities include: Color Guard, Drill team, and Rifle team competition, Service Learning Projects, and participation in local community events.

JROTC 10

Credit: 1
The second year of Leadership Education and Training is split into units including: Techniques of Communication, Leadership, Cadet Challenge, Leadership Lab, First Aid, Map Reading, History, Your American Citizenship, Career Opportunities, and Role of the U.S. Army. The wearing of the uniform and extracurricular activities are the same as for LET I.

JROTC 11

Credit: 1
The third year of Leadership Education and Training provides additional leadership situations. In this year students will not only be more involved as teachers and leaders within the Cadet brigade, but they will also do more independent studies in the areas of communication, leadership, financial management, history, career opportunities, college preparation, and technology awareness. The wearing of the uniform and the extracurricular activities are the same as for LET I.

JROTC 12

Credit: 1
The fourth-year cadets are responsible for the daily Cadet administration and perform as commanders and staff officers. They act as assistant instructors in some subject areas for other JROTC classes. They continue to develop their leadership skills and plan special unit events such as the military ball, parades and the annual awards banquet as well as several Leadership camps.

Mathematics

Algebra I Regents

Grades 8 and 9     Credit: 1
This course is a one-year Regents Level Course that follows the standards set forth by the New York State Education Department. The curriculum has a focus on algebra, linear functions, quadratics, and statistics. Algebra 1 satisfies year one of the three year Mathematics requirements for a Regents Diploma and prepares students for the Algebra 1 Common Core Regents exam, which is taken at the end of the course.

Prerequisite: Eighth grade students may take Algebra I (Regents) if they have at least a 90 average
in Math 7/8H.

Extended Algebra/Introduction to Geometry

Grade 10     Credit: 1
This is a one year course that provides students with an additional one semester of instruction in Algebra and the opportunity to take the NYS Algebra 1 Common Core Regents in January. The second semester of the course is an introduction to selected concepts in Geometry.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Algebra course.

Geometry Honors or Geometry Regents

Grades 10-12     Credit: 1
This course is a one-year Regents Level Course that follows the standards set forth by the New York State Education Department. The curriculum includes topics such as geometric relationships, constructions, rigid motions, proofs and coordinate geometry. The New York State Geometry Common Core Regents exam is taken at the end of the course. Geometry satisfies year two of the three year Mathematics requirement for a Regents Diploma.

The Honors Course includes more complex problem solving and a geometry project each quarter.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1 course and a passing grade on the Common Core Regents exam and teacher recommendation. An additional prerequisite for Geometry Honors is a grade of 80 or higher on the Algebra 1 Common Core Regents exam.

Algebra II Honors

Grades 10-12     Credit: 1
Students in this course will study advanced algebra topics and study the essential topics of trigonometry from the perspective of both the right triangle and the unit circle. Topics include: absolute value, relations and functions, transformations, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, regression, mathematical sequences, probability and statistics, trigonometric functions, trigonometric graphs, trigonometric applications and trigonometric identities and equations. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take the New York State Regents Exam which leads to an Advanced Regents Diploma. A graphing calculator is required for the course. The recommended model is the TI-84+.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1 Common Core Regents and Geometry Honors or Regents, a passing score on both Regents exams and a teacher recommendation.

Algebra 2

Grades 10-12     Credit: 1
Students in this course will study advanced algebra topics at a deeper level. Topics include: factoring, rational and irrational expressions and equations, complex numbers, quadratic equations, functions, laws of exponents, statistics and regression equations. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take a school exam. A graphing calculator is required for the course. The recommended model is the TI-84+.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra (Regents) and Geometry (Regents)

Pre-Calculus (UHS)

Grades 11-12     Credit: 1
Pre-Calculus is designed to prepare the students for a college level calculus course. The course will have a strong emphasis on the analysis of functions, the applications of trigonometry and solving real-life word problems. The final semester of Pre-Calculus will focus on the fundamentals of introductory calculus including limits, definition of derivative, derivative rules and curve sketching. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to take a school final exam approved by the University at Albany. A graphing calculator is required for this course. The recommended model is the TI 84+.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II Honors or Regents and a passing score on the Algebra II Regents.

Advanced Algebra and Topics

Grades 11-12     Credit: 1
This course includes a review of algebra and trigonometry concepts. Topics include factoring, rational expressions, solving linear and quadratic equations, functions, lines, exponential equations, matrices, mathematical sequences, logarithms, trigonometry, topics in number theory and introduction to derivatives. A graphing calculator is required for the course. The recommended model is the TI 84+. This course is part of the College in the High School program and may be taken for credit from Hudson Valley Community College

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Algebra, Geometry, and Algebra II

Advanced Algebra

Grades 11-12     Credit: 1
Advanced Algebra is a combination of two HVCC College in the High School courses: College Algebra with Trigonometry and Elementary Statistics.

College Algebra with Trigonometry

The course includes a review of algebra and numerical trigonometry. Topics include factoring, rational expressions, solving linear and quadratic equations, solving simultaneous linear equations, functions, lines, exponentials, logarithms, numerical trigonometry and solving triangles. A graphing calculator is required for the course. The recommended model is the TI 84+. The course may be followed by Precalculus.

Elementary Statistics

This course serves as an introduction to the concepts of data analysis and statistics. Applications will come from a variety of areas. Topics include, but are not limited to, data analysis and summary for both one and two variables, sampling techniques and design of experiments, basic probability concepts, discrete and continuous probability distributions, the central limit theorem, sampling distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. This course is project driven and will include significant use of technology for computations and analysis.

Students have the opportunity to earn eight (8) college credits (four each semester) from this course.

AP Calculus

Grades 11-12     Credit: 1
AP Calculus is a college level course in differential and integral calculus, the equivalent of the first semester at most universities. This course is designed to prepare students for the AP Calculus exam in May and provide them with a well-rounded foundation to aide them with subsequent math courses. Particular emphasis will be placed on key concepts and core calculus techniques and the real-life implementation of these ideas and methods. This course is also approved for UHS credit. A graphing calculator is required for the course. The recommended model is the TI 84+.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus or another approved PreCalculus
college or high school course and having attained a grade of at least 85.

AP Statistics

Grades 11-12     Credit: 1
AP Statistics acquaints students with the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will frequently work on projects involving the hands-on gathering and analysis of real world data. Ideas and computations presented in this course have immediate links and connections with actual events. Computers and calculators will allow students to focus deeply on the concepts involved in statistics. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement examination in Statistics.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus or another approved Pre-Calculus college or high school course.

Music

Wind Band

Credit: .5
This band is an audition-based group, which plays at a higher level than any other ensemble. Composed primarily of high school students, this band plays at numerous school functions and concerts. It rehearses three times during the six day cycle. Students also receive school credit and a grade.

Jazz Band

Credit: .5
Jazz Ensemble is also an audition-based ensemble. The students explore jazz music and improvisation, and they perform at all music concerts.

Symphonic Band

Credit: .5
The Symphonic Band is geared toward entry-level players up to the NYSSMA Level III. This group rehearses three times a cycle and performs at our bi-annual music department concerts as well as at Open House, and some school functions.

Concert Band

Credit: .5
The Concert Band is an entry level band. It is designed to foster the development of the skills required to play traditional band instruments. The Concert Band is open to all CBA students.

Music Theory I (CHS)

Grades 11-12     Credit: 1
This basic theory course will offer interested students an overview of college level theory and ear training with some music history and accompanying listening examples.

Prerequisites: Ability to read music and teacher approval.

Physical Education

Physical Education 9-10

Credit: 1 (.5 Credit per course)
The Christian Brothers Academy Physical Education Program is designed to assist the student in developing his full potential. Each student is encouraged to develop a bridge between recreation and healthful living habits which will be a lifetime foundation for self-fulfillment and achievement; for caring and gaining a responsible place in society. Students are taught to value personal qualities of self-control, discipline, good sportsmanship, rules and regulations, and respect for others in life situations. Our goal is that each student possesses a personal sense of self-confidence, social graces, pride toward life and self and the desire to pursue excellence in his endeavors.

Physical Education 11-12

Credit: 1 (.5 Credit per course)
The Christian Brothers Academy Physical Education Program is designed to assist the student in developing his full potential. Each student is encouraged to develop a bridge between recreation and healthful living habits which will be a lifetime foundation for self-fulfillment and achievement; for caring and gaining a responsible place in society. Students are taught to value personal qualities of self-control, discipline, good sportsmanship, rules and regulations, and respect for others in life situations. Our goal is that each student possesses a personal sense of self-confidence, social graces, pride toward life and self and the desire to pursue excellence in his endeavors.

Science

Earth Science Honors or Earth Science Regents

Grades 9-10     Credit: 1
Earth Science is a laboratory science course that explores origins and the connections between the physical, chemical, and biological processes of the earth system. Students experience the content of earth Science through inquiry-based laboratory investigations and focus on topics associated with matter, energy, crystal dynamics, cosmic evolution, and structure, cycles, geochemical processes, and the expanded time scales needed to understand events in the earth system. Earth Science provides the knowledge, skills, and habits of mind needed for problem solving and ethical decision making about scientific and technological issues. Embedded standards for Inquiry and Technology & Engineering are taught in the context of the content standards for the Universe, Energy in the Earth System, Cycles in the Earth System, and Geologic History.Students will take the NYS Earth Science Regents exam at the end of the course.

In addition to the course description above the Earth Science Honors course will include the following:

  • Reading and writing assignments that will encourage and require a greater depth of understanding of Earth Science concepts and require students to proficiently communicate their ideas. Some of these assignments may require additional research into a particular area of Earth Science.
  • Honors lab activities and extensions that will require more sophisticated math and reasoning skills. Frequently used mathematic concepts include using rations, geometry, trigonometry, and algebra to help convey scientific information. These lab activities will require higher level analytical skills and the ability to work independently.
  • Mandatory projects involving independent research and analysis will be assigned each quarter.
  • Honors-level assessments (quizzes, tests, etc.) that will reflect the depth of understanding expected of Honors students.

Students will take the NYS Earth Science Regents exam at the end of the course.

Living Environment (Biology) Honors or Living Environment (Biology) Regents

Grades 9-10     Credit: 1
Instruction focuses on the eight basic topics from the State syllabus, ranging from the activities of living things to identifying and defining interrelationships among organisms. Themes describing unity and diversity of organisms are further developed into the structure and function of anatomy and the transmission of traits from generation to generation. Evolution and ecology describe patterns of the origins of organisms as well as their interdependencies. As part of this course, the students must complete 1200 minutes of laboratory work and must have a complete file of their satisfactory written reports for each lab. This class will prepare students for the NYS Regents exam which will be taken in June at the conclusion of the school year.

The Honors course is designed for the science-oriented student who may be considering a career in science. The Honors curriculum covers concepts in greater depth and detail. The course involves advanced readings in order to strengthen reading and comprehension across the curriculum and to better prepare students for future AP courses and the SAT exam. Areas of concentration include: research skills, scientific inquiry, biochemical aspects of modern biology, cells genetics, evolution, ecology, human anatomy and physiology.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Earth Science and/or teacher recommendation.

General Chemistry

Grades 11-12     Credit: 1
This course is designed for the third year science students and will provide instruction in topics including but not limited to matter and energy, atomic structure, bonding, periodic tables and acids and bases. The course, while examining fewer topics, will examine topics and concepts in depth. Laboratory methods and skills will be learned in order to expand the student’s understanding of Chemistry. A comprehensive school exam will be administered at the end of the course. This is not a NYS Regents Course.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Earth Science, Biology, and Integrated Algebra.

Honors Chemistry

Grade 10-11     Credit: 1
The chemistry curriculum includes the following topics: matter and energy, atomic structure, bonding, periodic table, mathematics of chemistry, kinetics and equilibrium, acids and bases, redox and electrochemistry, organic chemistry, application of chemical principles, and nuclear chemistry. During the year the students develop skills in measurement, handling chemicals safely, and collecting and organizing data/evidence. They then will be encouraged to think critically, weigh the evidence, and extend their problem solving abilities. The Honors level course includes all additional materials in the New York State Syllabus. In addition, students will perform more demanding laboratory experiments requiring applications of chemical mathematics principles and equation writing skills. Students must complete a satisfactory lab report for each laboratory investigation. A complete laboratory folder is necessary in order for the student to take the required New York State Regents Examination at the end of the school year.

Prerequisites: are the successful completion of Earth Science (Regents) and Biology (Regents) as well as successful completion of Integrated Algebra, and Geometry. It is strongly suggested that the student has either completed Algebra II or be currently enrolled in Algebra 11 and be recommended by his Earth Science or Biology teacher.

Forensic Science

Grades 11-12     Credit: 1
Forensics is a two-semester, interdisciplinary science and technology course. Students will learn how to observe, collect, analyze and evaluate data found at crime scenes. Some of the topics covered include: fingerprint analysis, ballistics, DNA fingerprinting, blood splatter, toxicology. Forensics uses and variety of activities, for instance, class discussions, projects, and labs.

Physics

Grades 11-12     Credit: 1
The prerequisites are the successful completion of Mathematics Courses Integrated Algebra, Geometry, and Algebra 11 (or to be currently enrolled in Algebra 11). This course has a laboratory requirement since physics is best learned using an investigative approach. Satisfactory laboratory reports must be written by the student for each investigation. Students are also required to demonstrate several manipulative skills. Physics encompasses five core areas and six optional topics. The five core areas are: mechanics, energy, electricity and magnetism, wave phenomena, and modern physics. The optional topics include: motion in a plane, internal energy, electromagnetic applications, geometric optics, solid state physics and nuclear energy. During the year students will master skills, develop positive science attitudes, and extend their problem solving abilities. Activities and problems are chosen to foster critical thinking as the students collect evidence, and weigh that evidence. The rapid development of scientific knowledge in our physical world demands that adults be able to make informed decisions on the problems and issues facing our society. Students will develop scientific literacy by becoming knowledgeable about the physical world, developing skills and positive attitudes to solve problems in physics. This course is offered at the Regents and Honors levels.

Prerequisites: are the successful completion of Integrated Algebra, Geometry, and Algebra II (or to be currently enrolled in Algebra II).

AP Biology

Grade 11     Credit: 1
Advanced Placement Biology is an introduction to college biology that focuses on the following areas: the molecular basis of life and cells, principles and theories of evolution and organismal and population biology. Laboratory experiences are a vital part of this course. Students take the Advanced Placement Biology Examination in the spring.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Regents Biology and Regents Chemistry and for those who are considering a career in the biological or medical sciences.

AP Physics

Grade 12     Credit: 1
AP Physics is a college level course that uses advanced algebra and trigonometry as the primary tools for problem solving. The course covers topics in mechanics, energy, waves, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, optics, quantum theory, and nuclear physics. Students take the Advanced Placement Physics Examination in the spring. This course is recommended for students who have completed Honors Chemistry and are seeking an additional challenge far beyond the Regents Physics course.

AP Chemistry

Grades 11-12     Credit: 1
Advanced Placement Chemistry is an introduction to college chemistry that focuses on many areas including the behavior of gases, chemical bonding, kinetics and equilibrium. Laboratory experiments are a vital part of this course and students are expected to write detailed reports. This course is recommended to students who have completed the Regents or Honors Chemistry course with distinction and are interested in majoring in science or pre-medicine in college.

Social Studies

Global Studies 9 Honors

Grade 9     Credit: 1
This course is the first year of a two-year sequence in Global Studies. It is a study of the cultures and history of Africa, East Asia, Middle East, and Latin America. The course begins with early civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, India, and China. The emphasis is on the growth of these civilizations and their relationship to the culture of Western Europe. The Honors course is designed to create additional assignments and challenges and prepare students for AP World History.

Prerequisites: Completion and passing 8th Grade social studies with an average of 93 or above and/or teacher recommendation)

Global Studies 9 Regents

Grade 9     Credit: 1
This course is the first year of a two-year sequence in Global Studies. It is a study of the cultures and history of Africa, East Asia, Middle East, and Latin America. The course begins with early civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, India, and China. The emphasis is on the growth of these civilizations and their relationship to the culture of Western Europe.

Prerequisites: Completion of Social Studies 8 and passing 8th Grade

AP World History

Grade 10-12     Credit: 1
The Advance Placement program in World History is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in modern World History. The course is rigorous in the sense that it covers the “big picture” of all of World History beginning with Neolithic Man and ending with the Modern Era. The course is divided into five main periods of history. Each period will be followed by only one large exam per marking period.

Students should expect between forty-five minutes to an hour of AP World homework per night between 4-5 nights per week. Weekend assignments are the norm, not the exception. Take home essay assignments supplement in-class examinations. Two historical books will be read during the year in addition to the text and will require writing assignments. Students are required to sit for both the AP Exam and the NYS Global History and Geography Regents.

In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals of the course are to develop the following: An understanding of some of the principal themes in modern World History An ability to analyze historical evidence An ability to analyze and to express historical understanding in writing

Prerequisites: Mastery of Global 9 (92 average or better, passage of AP entrance exam, teacher recommendation, approval of department chair/academic associate principal)

Global Studies 10 Regents

Grade 10     Credit: 1
The Global Studies II course is a study of world civilization from pre-historic to modern times. All major cultures are studied to learn their contributions to the development of world civilization. In the Regents class, a wide variety of important concepts are reviewed in order to enable the student to achieve on the New York State Regents Examination and at the same time cultivate an appreciation of the discipline of Social Studies.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Global Studies 9

Advanced Placement US History

Grade 11-12     Credit: 1
The Advanced Placement Program in United States History is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in Unites States history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college history courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. An Advanced Placement United States History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Global Studies 9 and 10 or AP World History (92 average or better, passage of AP entrance exam, teacher recommendation, approval of department chair/academic associate principal)

US History Regents

Grade 11     Credit: 1
This course provides students with an overview of American history as well as preparation for the New York State Regents examination. All major periods, events, and themes are covered from Colonial America through the Modern Era.

Prerequisites: Completion of Global History and Geography 9 & 10 or AP World History

Government

Grade 12     Credit: .5
Government This course covers the function of the US Government including the election process, and the influence the media has on government. The learning process is facilitated by a lecture and class discussion approach.

Economics

Grade 12     Credit: .5
Economics This course involves the study of choice, cost and benefit as it relates to individuals and society as a whole. This course highlights the structure of the free market system of the United States and the reasons for the success of the system as well as its shortcomings.

Sociology

Grades 11-12     Credit: 1
Sociology examines the basic strategies humans have developed to insure the continuing survival of the species. The course itself is broken down into six main areas: Culture, Roles, Groups, Socialization, Deviance, and Stratification. The learning process is facilitated by a lecture-class discussion approach. There is a definite homework requirement and a short hypothesis paper each semester.

Technology and Engineering

Advanced Computer Applications (CHS)

Grades 10-12     Credit: 1
Advanced Computer Applications is a College in the High School class offered through Hudson Valley Community College. Students are eligible to earn up to 6 college credit hours while taking this class as a CBA sophomore, junior or senior. The class is broken up into two semester courses, with descriptions below.

CMPT 101 (Personal Computer Concepts and Applications I)

Grades 10-12     Credit: 1
This course provides both a practical and conceptual background in computing and information processing and management fundamentals. Students receive hands-on experience while learning the latest graphical interface technology and how it interacts with word processing, spreadsheets, database management, presentation graphics and the Internet. Microsoft Windows and Windows applications are the software products used. Lab time outside of class is required. Students must have some familiarity with the Windows Operating System or computers using graphical user interfaces (e.g. Mac OS or Linux). Students with no computing experience should take AITC 101, Computer Literacy prior to enrolling in CMPT 101.

CMPT 115

Grades 10-12     Credit: 1
Advanced Computer Applications is a College in the High School class offered through Hudson Valley Community College. Students are eligible to earn up to 6 college credit hours while taking this class as a CBA sophomore, junior or senior. The class is broken up into two semester courses, with descriptions below.

Mechanical Drawing

Grades 10-12     Credit: 1
This course is designed to introduce basic drafting and to allow the students to exercise their creative abilities. Students will learn about the care and use of equipment, Orthographic Projection, Dimensioning, Pattern Development, Isometric and Architectural drawing.

Projects include: (In addition, students will each have one week to work on the computer using an architectural program, creating their own house floor plan) Lettering Straight Line Letters, Lettering Curved Letters, Inlaid Linoleum Design (learning to use the T-square, triangles and setting up layouts), Brick Wall (learning to use various scales), Base Plate (working with angles), Adjusting Arm (learning to use the compass correctly), Introduction to Orthographic Projections (multi-view drawings), Flower Pot Stand (learning basic dimensioning), Wedge (dimensioning angles, solving missing view drawings), Bearing (dimensioning circles, arcs), V-Block (using leader lines), Cam Bracket (working with concave and convex curves), Support, Pattern Development, Paper Carton (developing patterns for box construction), Truncated Cylinder (developing patterns for duct work), 3-Piece Elbow, 90 Degree T-Joint, Isometric Drawing (working with 3-D drawings involving circles and arcs), Cabinet Drawing (3D drawing and perspective), Window, Louvre Door (details of architectural drawings), Plan Symbols (learning about finished construction), Floor Plan (applying Plan Symbols), Gable-side Elevation (working with roof pitch and detail)

AP Computer Science

Grades 11-12     Credit: 1
This course is equivalent to a first semester college-level course in Computer Science. It emphasizes object orientation, programming methodology and efficient, understandable design in programs. Topics covered include program and class design, arithmetic and logical expressions, design modularity, control structures, repetition, quadratic sorting, inheritance, one and two-dimensional arrays and other data structures. The programming language used for this course is Java.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra II and PLTW CSP, or teacher recommendation.

Project Lead the Way

Project Lead the Way (PLTW) is a program that provides challenging and innovative curriculum for use by schools in the areas of science, technology, engineering and math.   According to PLTW it exists “…to prepare students for the global economy through its world class curriculum, high quality professional development and an engaged network of educators, students, universities and professionals. The hands on project based program engages students on multiple levels, exposes them to areas of study that they typically do not pursue…”

Principles of Engineering – Not offered 2015-2016

Grades 10-12     Credit: 1
Students delve into the engineering design process and apply math, science and engineering standards to hands-on projects. They work both individually and in teams to design solutions to a variety of problems.

Introduction to Engineering and Design

Grades 9-12     Credit: 1
Students delve into the engineering design process and apply math, science and engineering standards to hands-on projects. They work both individually and in teams to design solutions to a variety of problems.

Project Lead the Way: Computer Science Principles

Grades 9-12     Credit: 1
This course aims to develop computational thinking, generate excitement about career paths that utilize computing, and introduce professional tools that foster creativity and collaboration. CSP helps students develop programming expertise and explore the workings of the Internet. Projects and problems include app development, visualization of data, cybersecurity, and simulation. The course curriculum is a College Board-approved implementation of AP CS Principles. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of PLTW IED or teacher recommendation. This course is a pre-requisite for AP Computer Science.

Theology

Theology I

Credit: 1

This course provides the student with an in-depth study of the Hebrew Scriptures and an introduction to the Christian Scriptures.

Concepts to be covered include: Explanation of terms: Word of God, Revelation, Salvation History, and Covenant.  Additional topics include:  An overview of the structure of the Bible and its literary forms, a look at the correlation between Biblical covenant and God’s call to all humanity to covenant relationships, a development of a reverence for Sacred Scripture as the Word of God, as well as the life of St. John Baptist De La Salle.

Theology II

Credit: 1

OBJECTIVE: To appreciate the meaning of the Sacraments, prayer, worship and faith throughout the history of the Catholic Faith.

ACTIVITIES: Delve into the nature of the Sacraments, explore the meaning and role of liturgy and Para liturgies in celebrating the Sacraments, participate or observe several Eucharistic liturgies and communal ceremonies of Reconciliation, discuss the role of Sacraments, prayer and worship in our own spiritual life and how they compare with other religions, and define faith and evaluate its effect on individuals.

Theology III

Credit: 1

OBJECTIVE: To understand the Christian vision of morality, with Jesus as our model.

ACTIVITIES: Understand the steps in the decision-making process, acquire a foundation from which to reach decisions on contemporary moral issues and confront them in the light of Christian values, explore possible influences on decision-making, such as: survival, need, group affiliation, peer pressure, law and conscience, develop positive attitudes about oneself, life, other persons, and things that stem from the Christian interpretation of life, and study of current events as related to morality.

Theology IV

Credit: 1

OBJECTIVE: To provide an analysis of the social teachings of the Catholic Church as they pertain to many contemporary issues of social justice.

ACTIVITIES: Participate in student-led seminar discussions; discuss current events and issues in social justice; examine several teaching documents and letters issued by the Catholic Church, especially the U. S. Conference of Catholic Bishops; explore the meaning of the 7 Themes of Catholic social teaching.